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Russian Armored vehicles go Airborne -The Firearm Blog

This Russian Airborne crew seem to have misunderstood the meaning of being an Airborne force.

They take their armored vehicles back into the air, going flat out over obstacles.

To the best of my knowledge, this is a BMD-2 we see flying above. That’s 11.5 tonnes of tracked armor you see flying.

The BMD-2 is a Soviet airborne, amphibious, and obviously tracked IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle).

Final arrivals of crews of armored vehicles in the framework of the contest “Airborne platoon” at the site of the Red Strug.

Below: Better watch out – flying tanks ahead!

The BMD-2 has a 30 mm 2A42 multi-purpose autocannon with 300 rounds.

There is also a 7.62 mm PKT coaxial tank machine gun.

The main armament on the previous model, the BMD-1, is normally a 73 mm low pressure, smoothbore short-recoil semi-automatic gun with some 40 rounds. It is called the  2A28 “Grom”

When, and if, the BMD-1 is dropped from the air, it is secured to a special pallet and parachuted out of a cargo plane. It can also be carried by some helicopters.

To make it “safe” (safer) to land, a rocket parachute called the PRSM-915, was developed.

You get the idea from the Tweet below. I’d rather not be sitting inside during the drop, please.

More pictures, from another event.

This picture is just odd. As you may note, the flag on the armored vehicle is from Venezuela.

 

So, how do you like the flying lumps of steel?

 

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