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MD Gov. Hogan Vetoes Ban on Private Transfers of Long Guns

Governor Larry Hogan upheld the rights of legal gun-owners in MD. IMG NRA-ILA

U.S.A. -(AmmoLand.com)- Long guns represent the smallest fraction of all firearms used in crimes in the United States. Despite this, most Democratic politicians can’t stop wringing their hands over the prospect of banning them. Recently, Maryland was the target of one such ban. Where Democrats sought to prevent lawful gun owners from privately transferring shotguns and rifles. Thankfully, Governor Larry Hogan vetoed this recent attempt to further erode the Second Amendment. The NRA has the full details below.

Today, Governor Larry Hogan issued a veto on Senate Bill 208 and House Bill 4.  Gov. Hogan knows that restricting law-abiding citizens will do nothing to stop criminals.  In his statement on the veto, he reaffirmed his priority to “hold violent criminals accountable” for their actions.

These bills would have banned the sale or transfer of long guns between private individuals without first paying fees and obtaining government permission.  Firearm transfers such as loans and gifts between friends, neighbors, or fellow hunters, would not have been exempted.  Research shows such proposals have no impact on violent crime and Gov. Hogan is to be commended for refusing to recognize the false claims pushed by anti-gun advocates on this legislation.


National Rifle Association Institute For Legislative Action (NRA-ILA)

About NRA-ILA:

Established in 1975, the Institute for Legislative Action (ILA) is the “lobbying” arm of the National Rifle Association of America. ILA is responsible for preserving the right of all law-abiding individuals in the legislative, political, and legal arenas, to purchase, possess and use firearms for legitimate purposes as guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Visit: www.nra.org

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